Reference: Honda Spring Rates



#1
Hey CI, Here is a compiled list of spring rates for many different aftermarket (and OEM) springs for Integras and Civics
This is not a perfect list so if you have any corrections please say so.


Normal Springs (Linear rate Springs, Specific Rate Springs)
In a normal spring, space between the coils are equal. Normal (or linear rate) springs are designed to respond with a specific rate when compressed.

Consider we have a 10-coil spring, each coil spaced 2 centimeters apart. Put a load on the spring to compress it 2 centimeters. Because in Normal Springs coils compress at the same rate, this 2 centimeters will be divided into all 10 coils equal, resulting each coil spaced 1,8 cm apart. Put another additional load which is the same as the first one and the coils will become 1,6 cm apart.



Progressive Springs (Rising Rate Springs, Progressive Rate Springs, Progressive Wound Springs)
In progressive springs each coil is spaced differently and have a variable spring rate. When free, it is easy to compress progressive springs for first centimeters. As you apply more forces, coil on a progressive spring come closer. After a certain point, coil at the top 1/4 of progressive springs begin to touch each other and finally become inactive or dead, and that makes the spring stiffer. Apply more forces to a progressive spring then it becomes stiffer because as the number of active coils in a spring decreases, the spring rate increases. So, progressive springs may both be sensitive to very small bumps on the road, while giving the stiffness you need during hard braking and turning.


P - Progressive Springs
L - Linear Springs

For 94-01 DC Integra
Code:
97, 00-01 ITR factory			250F/250R (L/P)
GS-R factory				200F/95R (P/P)
OEM 60x343mm				252F/140R (L/L)
Comptech Sport				335F/210R (L/P)
Eibach Pro Kit				288F/213R (P/P)
Eibach Sport Line			325F/241R (P/P)
Endless Zeal Function B6 Hard		672F/448R (L/L)
Endless Zeal Function B6 Street		560F/336R (L/L)
Ground Control Coilovers		380F/250R (L/L)*
H&R OE Sport				302F/168R (P/P)
H&R Race				460F/350R (L/L)
H&R Sport				276F/276R (L/P)
HKS SF5					398F/291R (L/L)
KW variant 1				needed (L/L)
KW variant 2				needed (L/L)
KW variant 3				needed (L/L)
Mugen 5 Adjustment Kit			381F/252R (L/L)
Neuspeed Race				455F/360R (L/L)
Neuspeed Soft Sport			250F/185R (P/P)
Neuspeed Sport				250F/185R (P/P)
Omni-Power Adjustable Sleeve Coilover	448F/336R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Sport Coilovers		539F/448R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Street Coilovers		448F/336R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Drag Coilover		810F/810R (L/L)*
Omni-Power 6-Way Damping Coilovers	539/448/336 (L)*
RS*R Race				279F/268R (L/L)
RS*R SUS				242F/173R (P/P)
SkunkWerks Coilovers (old)		500F/400R
Skunk2 Coilovers (new)			500F/400R (L/L)
Spoon Progressive			358F/303R (P/P)
Spoon Stright Spring 60x200mm		448F/448R (L/L)
Swift Sport Mach Luxury			336F/196R (L/L)
Tanabe DF210				241F/201R
Tanabe GF210				302F/235R
Tanabe NF210				274F/201R
Tein High Tech				296F/257R (P/P)
Tein S-Tech				335F/274R (P/P)
For 96-00 Civics (EJ, EK and EM1 chassis codes)
Code:
96-00 EX factory			165F/80R (P/P)
99-00 Si (EM1) factory			201F/99.8R (P/P)
CTR factory				240/240 (L/P)
APEX'i WS				447F/178R
Eibach ProKit				290F/190R (P/P)
Eibach Sportline			310F/275R (P/P)
Gold-line GL 2.5" drop			320/190 (P/P)
Gold-line GPS 1.25" drop		275/160 (P/P)
Ground Control Coilover			380F/280R (P/P)*
H&R OE					280F/190R (P/P)
H&R Sport				330F/280R (P/P)
JIC FLT-A2s (USDM)			504F/336R (L/L)
Koni RSK Suspension kit			154-205/270 (P/L)
Neuspeed SofSports			260F/150R (P/P)
Neuspeed Sport				280F/180R (P/P)
Neuspeed Race				485F/395R
Omni-Power Adjustable Sleeve Coilover	448F/336R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Street Coilovers		448F/336R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Sport Coilovers		539F/448R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Drag Coilover		810F/810R (L/L)*
Omni-Power 6-Way Damping Coilovers	539/448/336 (L)*
Progress Coilovers			350F/250R (P/P)
Progress Lowering Springs		320F/200R (P/P)
SkunkWerks Coilovers (old)		400F/300R (L/L)
Skunk2 Coilovers (new)			500F/400r (L/L)
Sparco					needed
Spoon Full Coilovers			300/240
SSR Cup					392/280
SSR S1					448/448
Suspension Techniques			10-15% more then stock (P/P)
Tanabe DF-210				10-15% more then stock
Tanabe NF-210				5-10% more then stock
Tein HT					1119F/448R (L/L)
Tein HG					365F/129-196R (L/P)
Tein SS					448F/224R
Tein Flex				504F/280R
Tein RA/RE/RS				783F/559R (L/L)
Tein S. Tech				235F/140R
Tokico Illumina Kit			250/123 (P/P)
For 02-05 Civic Si (EP3)
Code:
Eibach Pro-Kit				15-20% stiffer then stock
Eibach Sportlines			20-25% stiffer then stock
H&R Sport				25-30% more then stock
Omni-Power Street Coilovers		448F/336R (L/L)*
Omni-Power Sport Coilovers		539F/448R (L/L)*
Omni-Power 6-Way Damping Coilovers	539/448/336 (L)*
Progress				280F/500R
Sprint					20-25% more then stock
Tein Flex				448F/559R
Tein SS					336F/448R
Tein S. Tech				157F/291R
* = Can custom make coil-overs with superior spring rates (0.25lb/ft increases)





*thanks to a CC member named Eran*
 


Last edited:
#7

Spawne32

Shut up baby, I know it!
#8
a little tid bit of info for the first post if we get a sticky

1. Normal Springs (Linear rate Springs, Specific Rate Springs)
In a normal spring, space between the coils are equal. Normal (or linear rate) springs are designed to respond with a specific rate when compressed.

Consider we have a 10-coil spring, each coil spaced 2 centimeters apart. Put a load on the spring to compress it 2 centimeters. Because in Normal Springs coils compress at the same rate, this 2 centimeters will be divided into all 10 coils equal, resulting each coil spaced 1,8 cm apart. Put another additional load which is the same as the first one and the coils will become 1,6 cm apart.



2. Progressive Springs (Rising Rate Springs, Progressive Rate Springs, Progressive Wound Springs)
In progressive springs each coil is spaced differently and have a variable spring rate. When free, it is easy to compress progressive springs for first centimeters. As you apply more forces, coil on a progressive spring come closer. After a certain point, coil at the top 1/4 of progressive springs begin to touch each other and finally become inactive or dead, and that makes the spring stiffer. Apply more forces to a progressive spring then it becomes stiffer because as the number of active coils in a spring decreases, the spring rate increases. So, progressive springs may both be sensitive to very small bumps on the road, while giving the stiffness you need during hard braking and turning.
 
#10
I'll add this to the "How To" list under the "Misc. Information" section.
 
#11
if anyone has accretions, please say so.
 




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